Film review: Ghostbusters: Afterlife (in cinemas on 18 November 2021)

Ghostbusters: Afterlife is the fourth instalment of the supernatural action comedy Ghostbusters franchise that began with the 1984 hit movie. In three words Ghostbusters: Afterlife is contemporary, quirky and super fun and for me it will be the top family flick for this Christmas. It will hit UK cinemas on 18 November 2021.

The story 

The next chapter in the original Ghostbusters franchise comes from director Jason Reitman and producer Ivan Reitman. When single mum Callie -who’s barely making ends meet – and her two kids – 15-year-old Trevor (Finn Wolfhard) and 12-year-old Phoebe (Mckenna Grace), arrive in a small Oklahoma town called Summerville, they begin to discover their connection to the original Ghostbusters and the secret legacy their grandfather left behind. Their grandfather happened to be Egon Spengler who had spent all his money to build a strange looking farmhouse in the middle of nowhere, hit by daily earthquakes that had no logical and scientific explanation. 

 

The trailer 
 

 

The verdict 

I’ve been eagerly awaiting this movie from before the pandemic. I had no expectations when I went to the media screening at Cineworld Leicester Square. It is tough to make a great film after 3 successful blockbusters.

But yet, I came out very enthusiastic about it. And not just because one of the main stars is the sexiest man alive (voted by People), the one and only Paul Rudd, who has the qualities of the perfect guy with wit, charme, goofy geekdom and boyish look. But Afterlife is genuinely good for various reasons. 

The original props we loved so much about the Ghostbusters universe are all still there, i.e. the classic Ectomobile, the ghost trap, the portable nuclear particle accelerator — and the original cast is also making an appearance to please the loyal fans of the franchise.  

The new cast is funny, young and sexy (I am not referring just to Paul Rudd).

While watching, I was willing to forgive the predictable storylines to keep the classic Ghostbusters’ look and feel. I loved how Afterlife managed to pay tribute to the late Harold Ramis who died in 2014 and played the character of genius scientist Egon Spengler. 

Afterlife can be defined as a supernatural horror comedy but also as a coming-of-age movie. On this note, London Mums’ 10 year old child reporter Lilly was particularly impressed and inspired by the character of science whiz Phoebe who discovers a ghost trap in her grandfather’s house and she links the strange presences to the earthquakes. Phoebe is the movie’s true protagonist and we figure that when she starts playing a mysterious game of chess (with a ghost) in the old house.

I love this review Lilly sent me:

I disagree with the 13 certificate because it’s not scary at all. The teenagers in this film are actively involved in the ghost-busting and inspiring. The choice of casting Finn Wolfhard (from Stranger Things) adds a contemporary touch that makes this latest chapter appealing to younger audiences. In fact, I’d dare say that this Ghostbusters movie resembles more Stranger Things than the original Ghostbusters films. And for this particular reason, the London Mums’ and Kids’ club loved it almost more that the original flicks. 

 
London Mums’ rating: 8/10 
 
Kids’ club rating: 9/10
 
Ghostbusters’ documentary 
Ghostbusters’ super fans can get hold of a brilliant documentary exploring the classic flicks. Cleanin’ up the town: Remembering Ghostbusters is the ultimate behind-the-scenes documentary that showcases the making of the original 1984 Ghostbusters and pays a lovely tribute to the whole creative team and cast behind today’s global phenomenon. It’s out in the UK on Blu-Ray now, and in US on Crackle TV. It’s a MUST-HAVE Blu-Ray for fans and cinema goers as well as for curious children and teenagers who want to find out how special effects were made in the ‘80s. Cleanin’ up the town: Remembering Ghostbusters is THE documentary that will bring families together to remember a franchise that has changed the world of filmmaking. 
 
 
 

Facebook Comments