Book of the week: Star Wars Maker Lab

On 5th July, DK is publishing a new book full of projects with a Star Wars™ theme, Star Wars Maker Lab. My son and I had a sneak preview and absolutely loved it. 

 

Star Wars™ Maker Lab features 20 galactic projects that teach children how to become a master of science, in both the real world and the Star Wars galaxy. The greatest feature of this book is that it has clear step-by-step instructions for projects that can be done using easily sourced household items. The book guides home scientists and makers through a variety of experiments–from making Jabba’s gooey slime using PVA glue and baking soda, a gliding speeder to an Ewok catapult using sticks and twine and a glowing Gungan Globe of Peace.

My 11 year old son Diego loved trying to make some of the projects already and thought he will get on with completing them during the school holidays. It is indeed the perfect activity book for little scientists and young engineering fans, boys and girls as well as any Star Wars fans even adults. In fact, it is the ideal book for parents and children to get inspired and entertained over the Summer. 

Written by Liz Heinecke, science presenter and founder of KitchenPantryScientist.com, and Cole Horton, a historian and best-selling Star Wars author, Star Wars Maker Lab continues the success of DK’s popular Home Lab title, which emphasises the earth and environment. These titles have been resoundingly praised by educators, parents, and librarians for their ability to spark kids’ creativity and help them develop science skills through hands-on learning.

In Star Wars Maker Lab, each project’s difficulty level is represented through a series of Yoda heads, which range from simple to more challenging. Full-colour photography describes the household materials required for each project and breaks down the instructions, step-by-step, for an easy-to-follow reading (and making) experience. Project spreads feature famous movie scene stills, character quotes, and trivia, as well as sidebars that guide young makers as they build, tinker, and create, revealing the inspiration behind the Star Wars–themed experiments (“In a galaxy far, far away….” profiles). A “How It Works” panel breaks down the scientific principles at play in every experiment and an “In Our Galaxy” section goes a step further to provide makers with examples of the real-life science found outside their home labs.

Whether a budding scientist or a Star Wars superfan, Star Wars Maker Lab will inspire and excite children to create, craft, build, and make.

The authors are science communicator Liz Heinecke and author Cole Horton. 

Liz Heinecke is a writer and life-long Star Wars fan. After working in research labs for ten years and getting a master’s degree in bacteriology, she started doing science experiments with her kids, journaling their adventures on KitchenPantryScientist.com. Liz appears regularly on television and her other books include Kitchen Science Lab for Kids (Quarry Books 2014), Outdoor Science Lab for Kids (Quarry Books 2016) and STEAM. 

Cole Horton is a historian and games industry professional. He is the author of multiple Star Wars books, including Star Wars Absolutely Everything You Need to Know and Star Wars The Visual Encyclopedia. Cole graduated with a degree in history from Indiana University and has contributed as a historian to StarWars.com, Marvel AR, and Marvel.com. By day, he works on Star Wars games at EA and lives in San Francisco with his wife.

May the (static) Force be with you while supporting STREAM education initiatives and the Maker Movement.

RRP £16.99 (www.dk.com) © & TM 2018 LUCASFILM LTD. Used Under Authorization. 

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